IAE Blog

Information Age Education (IAE) is an Oregon not-for-profit corporation founded by David Moursund in August 2007. The IAE Blog was started in August 2010.

Progress in Science Leads to Still More Questions

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"Once you have learned how to ask relevant and appropriate questions, you have learned how to learn and no one can keep you from learning whatever you want or need to know." Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner. Teaching as a Subversive Activity.

Recently I viewed Stuart Firestein’s TED Talk, The Pursuit of Ignorance (Feinstein, February, 2013). Firestein is a cognitive neuroscience at Columbia University whose speciality is how the brain processes smells.

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Improving Worldwide Quality of Life

 

I have discussed Quality of Life (QoL) in two previous IAE Blog entries, (Moursund, 2/5/2016; Moursund, 12/24/2014).

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Very Long-range Strategic Planning

 I have long been interested in long-range planning (Moursund, June, 1987; Moursund, April, 1987). I think about designing and implementing a K-12 educational system for children who currently have an average life expectancy of about 80 years. When they finish (or drop out of) high school, on average they can look forward to at least 60 more years of life. What constitutes a good education for these children?

A recent issue of the MIT Technology Review included a report on The Future of Work by the very successful venture capitalist Steve Jurvetson (November-December, 2015). Successful venture capitalists are good at predicting the future of a company that is just getting started and/or is still very young. Here is a quote from Jurvetson’s predictions:

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Exploring Two Analogies About Our Educational System

A constructivist theory of learning posits that we build new knowledge on (by tying it into) our current knowledge. That is, our brain finds a pattern match (makes a connection) between what we already know and the new information we encounter. This is a type of analogical process that goes on in a learner’s brain.

Quoting from Robert Sylwester’s article, The Central Roles of the Varieties of Analogy, (Sylwester, September, 2013):

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Tell Me Some Good News

Each Tuesday I have lunch with some of my retired colleagues from the University of Oregon College of Education. Recently I posed the following question to them:

This morning I read the news on my tablet computer, listened to the news on the radio, and read a few miscellaneous magazine articles. Essentially every news item fell into my category of “doom and gloom” or I considered it to be relatively inconsequential. I asked my colleagues to share some of the happier and important news they had encountered so far in the day.

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