IAE Blog

Information Age Education (IAE) is an Oregon not-for-profit corporation founded by David Moursund in August 2007. The IAE Blog was started in August 2010.

Desirable Job Skills

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The world faces changes in employment patterns being brought about by continuing progress in technology. The table given below presents (rank ordered) desirable university graduate job skills in Europe (Pathak, 2/11/2016). Since there is a steady increase in worldwide competition to hire highly qualified college graduates, such lists tend to be useful to employers throughout the world. They also are of interest to students and educational systems throughout the world.

As I looked at these two lists, I noticed that there is considerable change from what employers were looking for in 2015, and their more recent thoughts on what they are looking for in the near future. Employers hiring university graduates are looking for smart, well-educated employees who have a track record of having the ability to learn new things and make creative use of their brains to solve complex problems.

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Diane Ravitch’s Blog on the Newly Released NAEP Report

 Quoting from the Wikipedia:

Diane Silvers Ravitch (born July 1, 1938) is a historian of education, an educational policy analyst, and a research professor at New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Previously, she was a U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education.

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Leadership: A California School Success Story

We are all interested in improving the quality of education that our children receive both in and outside of school. If there were a “magic pill,” to accomplish this task, I believe it would have been discovered. So far, no such luck.

As I read the education literature, I search for success stories. There are many such stories. But, is there a magic pill, or some ideas that can be easily replicated?

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Rapid Changes in GMO Technology

The MIT Technology Review is on my regular “must read” list of magazines that I subscribe to. Every issue contains articles that challenge my current knowledge and insights into how the world is changing.

The first issue of 2018 is certainly no exception. Antonio Regalado’s article about gene editing, These Are Not Your Father’s GMOs, caught my attention (Regalado, January/February, 2018). In brief summary, gene editing that merely changes a gene without inserting “foreign matter” is legal in the United States. For example, it is legal to insert an extra copy of a small piece (a snippet) of a plant’s DNA strand into the DNA strand, or to remove a snippet. This can be done with current technology, and it is being done.

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Larry Cuban

Larry Cuban is Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University. He was a high school social studies teacher (14 years), district superintendent (7 years), and university professor (20 years). He has published a very large number of op-ed pieces, scholarly articles, and books on classroom teaching, history of school reform, how policy gets translated into practice, and teacher and student use of technologies in K-12 and college.

Over the years, I have read many of Cuban’s articles. While I have not always agreed with what he was saying, I am always impressed by the quality of his thinking and clarity in expressing his ideas.

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