IAE Blog

Information Age Education (IAE) is an Oregon not-for-profit corporation founded by David Moursund in August 2007. The IAE Blog was started in August 2010.

What the Future Is Bringing Us: 2007 to 2018

The first IAE-pedia entry in the What the Future Is Bringing Us series was published on December 1, 2008. It included some articles that were published on the Web in 2007. My goal was to look at forecasts for likely changes in technology that were “coming down the pike” and consider some of their possible educational implications.

Less than three weeks ago, I began writing What the Future is Bringing Us: 2018. Access the current 2018 entries and those from the past 10 years in References and Resources at Moursund (January, 2018). This means that current readers can look back over the past ten years, and think about some of these old forecasts. What follows are three of the entries from What the Future Is Bringing Us: 2007. That IAE-pedia page contains information about some forecasts made in 2007 and some made in early 2008.

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Leadership: A California School Success Story

We are all interested in improving the quality of education that our children receive both in and outside of school. If there were a “magic pill,” to accomplish this task, I believe it would have been discovered. So far, no such luck.

As I read the education literature, I search for success stories. There are many such stories. But, is there a magic pill, or some ideas that can be easily replicated?

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Rapid Changes in GMO Technology

The MIT Technology Review is on my regular “must read” list of magazines that I subscribe to. Every issue contains articles that challenge my current knowledge and insights into how the world is changing.

The first issue of 2018 is certainly no exception. Antonio Regalado’s article about gene editing, These Are Not Your Father’s GMOs, caught my attention (Regalado, January/February, 2018). In brief summary, gene editing that merely changes a gene without inserting “foreign matter” is legal in the United States. For example, it is legal to insert an extra copy of a small piece (a snippet) of a plant’s DNA strand into the DNA strand, or to remove a snippet. This can be done with current technology, and it is being done.

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Larry Cuban: Retrospective Look at 2017

 

Larry Cuban is an emeritus professor at Stanford University. He is a prolific writer about our failures and successes in improving education. A recent article provides a few of his reminisces about the year 2017 (Cuban, 12/29/2017). Quoting from this article:

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The Math Learning Center

I was one of the founders of the Math Learning Center (MLC) and have served on its Board of Directors since this 501(c)(3) organization started 40 years ago. During these 40 years, I have advocated for increased use of calculators and computers in math education. Several hundred of my math education and computer education publications are available free online (IAE, 2017). Three of my more widely read math education articles are (Moursund, 2017a; Moursund, 2017b; and Moursund, 2017c).

One of my contributions to the MLC was getting it started in developing some online Math Manipulatives programs (Moursund, 4/19/2013). A catalog of the MLC’s current collection of 11 free online math manipulatives is available (MLC, 2017).

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Underwater Robotic Miners

Open Pit Lake.png

Almost every day I find one or more science and technology articles that really catch my attention. David Hambling’s article about developing robots to do underwater mining certainly provides a good example (Hambling, 10/23/2017).

The problem that many mining operations face is that of water getting into a mine. The history of steam engines is intimately connected with this problem. Steam engines were first developed to pump water out of mines. Quoting from Encyclopedia.com (n.d.):

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Larry Cuban

Larry Cuban is Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University. He was a high school social studies teacher (14 years), district superintendent (7 years), and university professor (20 years). He has published a very large number of op-ed pieces, scholarly articles, and books on classroom teaching, history of school reform, how policy gets translated into practice, and teacher and student use of technologies in K-12 and college.

Over the years, I have read many of Cuban’s articles. While I have not always agreed with what he was saying, I am always impressed by the quality of his thinking and clarity in expressing his ideas.

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Technology Use in Manitoba, Canada Schools

Technology Use
in Manitoba, Canada Schools

a new free book by

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Free Weekly Newsletter from MIT

The purpose of this IAE Blog entry is to introduce you to The Download, a free newsletter from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that I enjoy reading (MIT, n.d.). One of the interesting aspects of this free newsletter is that you can specify the areas you like to keep up with, and the weekly newsletter you receive will then focus on the topics you specify. The list of topic areas is:

  1. Business Impact
  2. Connectivity
  3. Sustainable Energy
  4. Rewriting Life
  5. Intelligent Machines

Samples from a Recent Issue

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Cognitive Computing

IBM is one of a large number of companies that are deeply engaged in developing uses of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to help solve problems and accomplish tasks (Moursund, 2017a). In 1997, an IBM computer system named Deep Blue defeated the reigning world chess champion in a six-game match. In 2011, an IBM computer system named Watson handily defeated former Jeopardy! winners Brad Rutter and Ken Jennings.

A recent interview of Ginni Rometty, Chief Executive Officer of IBM, discussed what that company is currently doing (Murphy, 9/25/2017). The interview began with Rometty explaining why IBM now uses the terminology Cognitive Computing rather than AI. Quoting Rometty:

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