IAE Blog

Information Age Education (IAE) is an Oregon not-for-profit corporation founded by David Moursund in August 2007. The IAE Blog was started in August 2010.

Some Shocking U.S. Financial News

“A penny saved is a penny earned.” (Attributed to Benjamin Franklin; one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, author, printer, political theorist, politician, scientist, inventor, statesman, and diplomat; 1706-1790).

Every once in a while I encounter a news item about personal finances of people in the United States. This IAE Blog entry briefly discusses two recent examples.

Continue reading
  2134 Hits
2134 Hits

A Personal Philosophy of Education

I have recently thoroughly revised and updated my IAE-pedia document, Free Math Software (Moursund, 7/15/2016). This site includes my current philosophy of education that emphasizes current and future roles of computers.

My Philosophy of Education

Continue reading
  2025 Hits
2025 Hits

Neuroscience, Global Education, and World Cooperation on Problem Solving

Here is information about a global brain science conference that caught my attention:

Hyldgård, P. (6/30/2016). What are the hottest trends in neuroscience? ScienceNordic. Retrieved 6/30/2016 from http://sciencenordic.com/what-are-hottest-trends-neuroscience.

Continue reading
  2115 Hits
2115 Hits

Virtual Reality in the Science Lab

“The medium is the message.” (Herbert Marshall McLuhan; Canadian philosopher of communication theory and a public intellectual; 1911-1980.)

"If you want to teach people a new way of thinking, don't bother trying to teach them. Instead give them a tool, the use of which will lead to new ways of thinking." (Richard Buckminster Fuller; American engineer, author, designer, inventor, and futurist; 1895-1983.)

Continue reading
  2242 Hits
2242 Hits

New Games Book by Bob Albrecht— Play Together, Learn Together : Roll, Pick, and Add Dice Games

Watch a first grade student playing a game that involves rolling dice. Probably you can look at the outcome of rolling a pair of dice and immediately say the total. The first grader may need to carefully count one die and then keep going with the second. The transition to the level of expertise you have comes from practice. People who advocate use of games in math education want the practice to be fun and to include additional learning activities.

For example, suppose only one die is rolled, and it comes out 4. Is it likely that, when a second die is rolled and added to the first, the total will be 11 or higher? (This is a tricky question—you want to challenge the child.) That is certainly a challenging question to most first graders. Answering it takes some understanding of the number line and some practice at doing mental arithmetic.

Continue reading
  2098 Hits
2098 Hits
Joomlashack