Information Age Education Blog

The goal of IAE is to help improve education at all levels throughout the world. This work is done through the publication of the IAE Blog, the IAE-pedia, the IAE Newsletter, books, and other materials all available free on the Web. For more information, go to http://iae-pedia.org/.
2 minutes reading time (355 words)

Children Will Learn to Do What They Want to Do

The TED videos are one of my favorite sources of information. Recently I viewed Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education. This 17-minute video is available free online at http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_the_child_driven_education.html.

Mitra, along many other teachers, feels that: “Children will learn to do what they want to do.” Quoting from the video listed above:

Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education—the best teachers and schools don't exist where they're needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

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You Can Help

The IAE Blog entries tend to have a relatively long "shelf life." However, over time, the references tend to get out of date. You can help your fellow readers and IAE by adding a Comment that includes an up-to-date reference and its URL. Your Comment should include a couple of sentences summarizing the up-to date-information and ideas.

Suggested Readings from IAE and Other Publications

Home and school environment—and games—in the math education of kids.

Joe the Plumber (the "common man"). Newsletter Issue 13, March, 2009.

Knowledge is Power.

Living in a world of black boxes, opaque boxes, and somewhat clearer boxes.

Self-assessment Instruments.

Using computers as an aid to retrieving and processing trustworthy and untrustworthy information. Newsletter Issue # 39 April 2010.

Using Your Brain to Retrieve and Process Trustworthy and Untrustworthy Information. Newsletter Issue # 38 March 2010. 

Video Games.

 

IAE

Mastery Learning: What Goes Around Comes Around
Students Learning from Each Other
 

Comments

David Moursund (website) on Saturday, 01 June 2013 02:20
Children learn by doing their own thing

Written by Dave Moursund, September 16, 2010.

I have four children, four step-children, and 11 grandchildren. It is interesting to watch how all of these children and grandchildren do their own thing, sometimes being greatly influenced by what their parents do, and sometimes revolting against their upbringing.

One of the nice things about the United States and a number of other countries is that children have many different opportunities in choosing possible life pathways. Many well-intentioned parents and schools attempt to be quite restrictive in the opportunities they provide for students. They have difficulty in achieving an appropriate balance between preparing children to become independent, self-directing thinkers and doers, and children who dutifully follow the pathways laid down by parents and schools.

Written by Dave Moursund, September 16, 2010. I have four children, four step-children, and 11 grandchildren. It is interesting to watch how all of these children and grandchildren do their own thing, sometimes being greatly influenced by what their parents do, and sometimes revolting against their upbringing. One of the nice things about the United States and a number of other countries is that children have many different opportunities in choosing possible life pathways. Many well-intentioned parents and schools attempt to be quite restrictive in the opportunities they provide for students. They have difficulty in achieving an appropriate balance between preparing children to become independent, self-directing thinkers and doers, and children who dutifully follow the pathways laid down by parents and schools.
David Moursund (website) on Saturday, 01 June 2013 02:22
I did not encounter the concept of master learning until a number of years after I finished my doctorate

Written by Dave Moursund, September 10, 2010.

My first experience with Mastery Learning came in the early 1970s when I was Head of the Computer Science Department at the University of Oregon. One of our faculty members experimented with Mastery Learning in an introductory level computer programming course. I was quite suspicious at the time, but in retrospect it seems clear that this was a good idea.

Written by Dave Moursund, September 10, 2010. My first experience with Mastery Learning came in the early 1970s when I was Head of the Computer Science Department at the University of Oregon. One of our faculty members experimented with Mastery Learning in an introductory level computer programming course. I was quite suspicious at the time, but in retrospect it seems clear that this was a good idea.
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