Information Age Education Blog

The goal of IAE is to help improve education at all levels throughout the world. This work is done through the publication of the IAE Blog, the IAE-pedia, the IAE Newsletter, books, and other materials all available free on the Web. For more information, go to http://iae-pedia.org/.
2 minutes reading time (474 words)

Reporting On Educational Changes Throughout the World

I have a large number of Facebook friends located throughout the world. I am very interested in hearing from some of you about how educational systems outside the United States are being affected by major change agents such as:

  1. Information and Communication Technology including the Web, Internet, Smartphones, tablet computers, laptop computers, computer games, computer-assisted learning, artificial intelligence, and so on.
  2. Research on brain science, especially cognitive neuroscience.
  3. Past and current research on learning theory, effective methods of teaching, student assessment, and teacher assessment.
  4. Pressures for more equal treatment of all students regardless of gender, ethnicity, race, religion, and level of income.
  5. Attempts to deal with education-related problems unique to a specific country. (What are some of the major educational problems in your country?)

Please consider submitting an article to Information Age Education. I am looking for articles that address the questions given above, ones that will help people from outside your country to understand both how well your educational system is doing and any major problems it is addressing. I am interested in three specific types of articles:

  1. IAE Blog entries. A “guest Blog entry” should be under 800 words in length. Authors should read a number of the current IAE Blog entries to see the general pattern that such blog entries follow.
  2. IAE Newsletters. Typically, these are 1,100 to 1,400 words in length. They are more “scholarly, academic” than IAE Blog entries and usually include relevant references to supportive material that is available free on the Web.
  3. IAE-pedia articles. These typically are longer than IAE Newsletters. They provide both breadth and depth in an area. One way to think about such a document is that it is like a chapter in a book written for preservice teachers, inservice teachers, and parents.

The Information Age Education editors will help you in developing an article that meets your own needs and IAE’s needs. If you have ideas for an article, feel free to send the idea to me in rough draft form. I will be happy to interact with you as you develop your ideas.

Note that IAE does not pay its authors, and that IAE does not charge its authors for printing their articles. All articles published will be available free on the Web to people throughout the world. The articles will be licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US). See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/.

I am looking forward to hearing from you.

David Moursund

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Two Women Advancing the Field of Information and C...
Brain Plasticity
 

Comments

Guest - David Moursund on Thursday, 22 December 2016 22:20
Worldwide Distance Education

Distance education is now an important component of higher education in the United States and in other countries. I recommend the following article:

Ravipati, S. (12/20/2016). Feds release final authorization rules for distance ed programs. Camus Technology. Retrieved 12/22/2016 from https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/20/feds-release-final-state-authorization-rules-for-distance-ed-programs.aspx.

Quoting from the article:

More than 5.5 million students are enrolled in distance education courses at degree-granting postsecondary institutions, [in the United States] according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In an effort to protect these students, the federal government has been working to improve oversight and clarify the state authorization requirements for institutions to participate in federal student aid disbursement programs.

Last Friday, the United States Department of Education published its final rules for distance education students, which incorporates feedback from postsecondary institutions and associations; distance education advocates; student and consumer advocacy groups; and state attorney generals. Effective July 1, 2018, colleges and universities will be required to receive authorization to operate from each state in which the institution enrolls students, if such authorization is required by the state.

The regulations also impose new obligations on institutions that have branch campuses in foreign countries: If 50 percent or more of an educational program is offered abroad, then the branch campus must be legally authorized by “an appropriate government authority” in that country. The department can request documentation of legal authorization from the foreign institution at any time without objection.

The final rules are available on the department website http://www2.ed.gov/documents/press-releases/07222016-state-authorization-nprm.pdf.

Distance education is now an important component of higher education in the United States and in other countries. I recommend the following article: Ravipati, S. (12/20/2016). Feds release final authorization rules for distance ed programs. Camus Technology. Retrieved 12/22/2016 from https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/20/feds-release-final-state-authorization-rules-for-distance-ed-programs.aspx. Quoting from the article: More than 5.5 million students are enrolled in distance education courses at degree-granting postsecondary institutions, [in the United States] according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In an effort to protect these students, the federal government has been working to improve oversight and clarify the state authorization requirements for institutions to participate in federal student aid disbursement programs. Last Friday, the United States Department of Education published its final rules for distance education students, which incorporates feedback from postsecondary institutions and associations; distance education advocates; student and consumer advocacy groups; and state attorney generals. Effective July 1, 2018, colleges and universities will be required to receive authorization to operate from each state in which the institution enrolls students, if such authorization is required by the state. The regulations also impose new obligations on institutions that have branch campuses in foreign countries: If 50 percent or more of an educational program is offered abroad, then the branch campus must be legally authorized by “an appropriate government authority” in that country. The department can request documentation of legal authorization from the foreign institution at any time without objection. The final rules are available on the department website http://www2.ed.gov/documents/press-releases/07222016-state-authorization-nprm.pdf.
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Saturday, 29 February 2020
Joomlashack