IAE Blog

Information Age Education (IAE) is an Oregon not-for-profit corporation founded by David Moursund in August 2007. The IAE Blog was started in August 2010.

Viewing “Now” from Past Forecasts

For a number of years the IAE-pedia has published links and brief descriptions of forecasts for the future. What the Future Is Bringing Us has had nearly 75,000 hits and currently covers the years 2007 to 2015. The same section of the IAE-pedia also includes a number of links to other “historical” IAE documents.

The complete list of 10 forecasts in 2007 was:

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  3579 Hits
3579 Hits

Poverty and Testing: Two Major Educational Problems

In a recent mailing to his email distribution lists, Jerry Becker recommended the following video:

Defies Measurement (Shine on Productions, 2013). 1:05 video. Retrieved 4/6/2015 from https://vimeo.com/user20632266/defiesmeasurementfilm.

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  3783 Hits
3783 Hits

Education for the Coming Technological Singularity

“In times of change, the learner will inherit the earth while the learned are beautifully equipped for a world that no longer exists.” (Eric Hoffer; American social writer and philosopher; 1902-1983.)

This is Part 2 of a two-part IAE Blog entry about our rapidly changing technology. The previous entry introduced the idea of a technological singularity. The term technological singularity refers to some time in the future when computers become much “smarter” than people.

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  6128 Hits
6128 Hits

Possible Futures of PreK-12 Education

I am very proud of the new 48-page book that I have just written and made available free. The full title is Technology and Problem Solving: PreK-12 Education for Adult Life, Careers, and Further Education. Here is the first part of Chapter 1.

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” (Thomas H. Huxley; English writer; 1825-1895.)

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  3227 Hits
3227 Hits

Robots Are Here and Lots More Are Coming

The title of this IAE Blog entry describes now and the future. My question is, what should our informal and formal educational systems—including schools, parents, and educational leaders—be doing about it?

We all know about outsourcing jobs to countries that have low labor costs. Perhaps we are less concerned about another type of outsourcing when industrial robots in our country and in many other countries take over jobs formerly performed by humans. This second type of “outsourcing” is decreasing the number of industrial manufacturing jobs performed by humans in the United States—a large and rapidly growing change.

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  5954 Hits
5954 Hits
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