Information Age Education Blog

The goal of IAE is to help improve education at all levels throughout the world. This work is done through the publication of the IAE Blog, the IAE-pedia, the IAE Newsletter, books, and other materials all available free on the Web. For more information, go to http://iae-pedia.org/.
3 minutes reading time (529 words)

Are High Schools Seriously Misleading Our Students?

Well over half of U.S. students graduating from high school have expectations of going on to college. Many of these students are grossly under-prepared to meet college standards.

An 8/18/2010 Wall Street Journal article available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703824304575435831555726858.html?KEYWORDS=high+school indicates:

New data show that fewer than 25% of 2010 graduates who took the ACT college-entrance exam possessed the academic skills necessary to pass entry-level courses, despite modest gains in college-readiness among U.S high-school students in the last few years.

How can it be that so many college-oriented students take and pass high school courses that they are led to believe are preparing them for college, and yet are not prepared for college? Who is to blame, and what can be done to significantly improve this disastrous situation?

My feeling is that we are doing our students a terrible disservice. We should be making a considerably greater effort to help students understand the quality of precollege education  they are obtaining, and how well it is preparing them for likely futures they will encounter in their first few years after leaving high school.

You have probably heard about the idea of authentic assessment and of the curriculum content and teaching processes that are aligned with the authentic assessment. What I feel is missing in such discussions is providing students with good aids to self assessment. Such aids include instruction in self assessment, materials to use in self assessment, and routine practice in self assessment. Every student should learn to take increased responsibility for their own education and the progress they are making in their informal and formal educational endeavors.

What You Can Do

Spend a bit of time reflecting on what you have just read. How does it fit in with your current knowledge, beliefs, and activities? How can you make use of the information to help improve our informal and formal educational systems? Who do you know that might benefit from reading this IAE Blog entry?

If the IAE Blog entries are useful to you, then consider signing up for a Free Subscription. (See the menu on the left side of the page). You will automatically receive email about new postings to the IAE Blog. Typically, there are about two or three new postings per week.

The IAE Blog entries tend to have a relatively long "shelf life." However, over time, the references tend to get out of date. You can help your fellow readers and IAE by adding a Comment that includes an up-to-date reference and its URL. Your Comment should include a couple of sentences summarizing the up-to date-information and ideas.

Suggested Readings from IAE and Other Publications

Assessing our schooling system. See http://i-a-e.org/newsletters/IAE-Newsletter-2010-54.html.

Being increasingly responsible for your own education. See http://i-a-e.org/iae-blog/being-increasingly-responsible-for-your-own-education.html.

Changing the world of education by failing more students. See http://i-a-e.org/iae-blog/changing-the-world-of-education.html

Creating academic standards that that may be inappropriate and unattainable. See http://i-a-e.org/myblog-admin/creating-academic-standards-that-that-may-be-inappropriate-and-unattainable.html.

Self assessment. See http://iae-pedia.org/Self_Assessment.

Self-assessment instruments. See http://iae-pedia.org/Self-assessment_Instruments.

Student and adult desires for instant gratification and extrinsic motivation are significant roadblocks to improving education. See http://i-a-e.org/newsletters/IAE-Newsletter-2009-24.html.

Student assessment in the science and non-science of science and non-science courses. See http://i-a-e.org/myblog-admin/student-assessment-in-the-science-and-non-science-of-science-and-non-science-courses.html.

Test anxiety and use of non-test methods to measure learning. See http://i-a-e.org/myblog-admin/test-anxiety-and-use-of-non-test-methods-to-measure-learning.html.

 

IAE

Being Increasingly Responsible for Your Own Educat...
 

Comments

David Moursund (website) on Saturday, 01 June 2013 01:37
Students need to be provided with good self-evaluation formative assessment instruments

Written by Dave Moursund, September 11, 2010

In my opinion, to a large extent our precollege education system has become a struggle between students and the school system. Contrast this with the possibility of a school system in which students and teachers, and others in the school system, willingly and collaboratively work together to help students get a good education and to help educators to have rewarding and fulfilling professional careers.

Some my thoughts on this idea are available at http://iae-pedia.org/Empowerin..._Teachers. I believe the most important focus area should be on helping and encouraging students to take greater personal ownership of and responsibility for their own education. Students need to make more progress on self-assessment and they need to be provided with much better self-assessment tools.

Written by Dave Moursund, September 11, 2010 In my opinion, to a large extent our precollege education system has become a struggle between students and the school system. Contrast this with the possibility of a school system in which students and teachers, and others in the school system, willingly and collaboratively work together to help students get a good education and to help educators to have rewarding and fulfilling professional careers. Some my thoughts on this idea are available at http://iae-pedia.org/Empowerin..._Teachers. I believe the most important focus area should be on helping and encouraging students to take greater personal ownership of and responsibility for their own education. Students need to make more progress on self-assessment and they need to be provided with much better self-assessment tools.
David Moursund (website) on Saturday, 01 June 2013 01:39
An example from Michigan

Written by Dave Moursund, February 14, 2011

Murry, Dave (2/8/2011). After being accused of 'lying' to parents, state board looks to raise the bar for MEAP tests. The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved 2/14/2011 from http://www.mlive.com/news/gran...ing_t.html.

The article discusses raising the cut point for passing the Michigan Educational Assessment Program. Quoting from the article:


State educators are ready to raise the bar for students to earn passing scores on state exams, with leaders saying the move is intended to prepare students for college and careers.

But the leader of an education advocacy group says the state Board of Education is finally owning up to an ugly fact: Michigan students haven't been doing as well as advertised.

The state board today is expected to vote on an Education Department recommendation for steps to raise “cut scores,” the percentage of questions students must answer correctly to be deemed proficient on Michigan Educational Assessment Program tests.

Students can get as few as 40 percent correct on some tests and still meet the mark. The tests are used, in part, to meet federal No Child Left Behind testing goals. Schools that don't make their goals face a series of sanctions and improvement programs.

Written by Dave Moursund, February 14, 2011 Murry, Dave (2/8/2011). After being accused of 'lying' to parents, state board looks to raise the bar for MEAP tests. The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved 2/14/2011 from http://www.mlive.com/news/gran...ing_t.html. The article discusses raising the cut point for passing the Michigan Educational Assessment Program. Quoting from the article: State educators are ready to raise the bar for students to earn passing scores on state exams, with leaders saying the move is intended to prepare students for college and careers. But the leader of an education advocacy group says the state Board of Education is finally owning up to an ugly fact: Michigan students haven't been doing as well as advertised. The state board today is expected to vote on an Education Department recommendation for steps to raise “cut scores,” the percentage of questions students must answer correctly to be deemed proficient on Michigan Educational Assessment Program tests. Students can get as few as 40 percent correct on some tests and still meet the mark. The tests are used, in part, to meet federal No Child Left Behind testing goals. Schools that don't make their goals face a series of sanctions and improvement programs.
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Saturday, 11 July 2020

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://i-a-e.org/

Joomlashack